Solar Wins! All Solar Decathlon Homes Achieve Energy Balance

All the homes in this year’s Solar Decathlon achieved net-zero energy balance, making more energy from the sun than they used. Solar energy is more efficient and affordable than ever.

This Solar Decathlon Home built by Team Capitol DC is being donated to the Wounded Warrior program to house returning veterans.

This Solar Decathlon Home built by Team Capitol DC is being donated to the Wounded Warrior program to house returning veterans.

The Solar Decathlon is a competition that challenges 20 colleges and universities to build net-zero energy efficient homes that are put to the test in 10 different events.  All the homes utilized solar energy and proved to be energy efficient.

 

All homes were put to the test in the Entertainment event, where each home hosted a dinner party and watched a movie.

All homes were put to the test in the Entertainment event, where each home hosted a dinner party and watched a movie.

Even with the rain, large screen TVs, night time parties, thousands of visitors walking through, opening up the refrigerator – all the competition homes turned solar energy into electricity and made more of it than they used or needed.

All the homes were comfortable, efficient and convenient.

Many teams created home monitoring apps that allow home owners to interact with the house even while away, with a touch to a smartphone screen.

 

The Affordability event in the Solar Decathlon challenges teams to build efficient and affordable solar energy-based homes.

This Solar Decathlon home from Norwich University cost $168,000 and made more energy than it used.

This Solar Decathlon home from Norwich University cost $168,000 and made more energy than it used.

The team from Norwich University, Vermont stepped up to the plate and presented a home that was estimated to cost $168,000. 

That price includes the home as it was constructed as well as all the appliances and energy systems.

 

The University of Texas as El Paso and the El Paso Community College created their entry: ADAPT.

The University of Texas as El Paso and the El Paso Community College created their entry: ADAPT.

The competing homes displayed a wide range of architectural savvy, some being on the cutting edge of modern cubism, while others were log cabin-traditional.

They all utilized the latest technology and appliances to create solar energy efficient homes.

The creativity displayed by the innovative engineering and architecture students is a breath of fresh air into the home building and energy sectors of society.

U of N Carolina SD2013 Winner of the People's Choice Award

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte was this year’s winner of the People’s Choice award.

ASUNM Solar Decathlon entry

Various types of solar panels were used in many different forms; this application provides shade for the southern facing deck, while it also provides the home with electricity.

This originality is a valuable asset as the world continues its upward trajectory in its use and need for electricity.

This year’s Solar Decathlon was a close one. Stanford University’s Start.Home led the scoreboard with a couple of days left, but was edged out by Vienna University of Technology (Austria), the University of Nevada (USA), Czech Technical University (Czech Republic) and the Stevens Institute of Technology (USA), respectively, to finish in 5th place.

Cal-Tech's modular energy into the 2013 Solar Decathlon

This ingenious entry from SCI-Arc CalTech utilized the sun’s energy efficiently and enjoyed it.

All the Solar Decathlon homes tied for 1st place in the Energy Balance event, making more solar-based electricity than they used. 

Thank you to all the teams that participated in this year’s Solar Decathlon.

You inspired and educated others while advancing clean, solar energy technologies.

Find more about the Solar Decathlon by visiting SolarDecathlon.gov.

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